Low Cost Feline Spay/Neuter Program

Scheduling an Appointment: Below are the package prices for spay/neuter surgery and the breakdowns of what is included.

Click here to apply for a spay/neuter surgery appointment

Once you review and choose the right package option for you and your feline friend, please submit an application. An application should be submitted for each individual cat in need of surgery. Once your application is received and processed, you will be contacted via email within 48-72 hours of submission. The email will contain current available surgery dates/times and important information regarding your pets’ appointment.

 

Feral Cat Prices - Trap, Neuter, Return (TNR) Program 

Price Package A-$35.00 Price Package B-$70.00 Price Package C-$100.00
Includes: Includes: Includes:
- 1yr Rabies Vaccination
- Spay/neuter surgery
- Eartipping
*Felv/FIV testing can be
added to package A for $30*
- Initial FVRCP vaccination
(needs booster in 3-4 weeks)
- 1yr Rabies vaccination
- Spay/neuter surgery
- Eartipping
- Flea preventative
- Dewormer
- Initial FVRCP vaccination
(needs booster in 3-4 weeks)
- 1yr Rabies vaccination
- Spay/neuter surgery
- Eartipping (optional)
- Flea preventative
- Dewormer
- Felv/FIV testing

Owned Cat Prices - Low Cost Spay/Neuter Program

Price Package A - $75.00 Price Package B - $110.00
Includes: Includes:
- 1yr Rabies Vaccination
- Spay/neuter surgery
- Initial FVRCP vaccination
(needs booster in 3-4 weeks)
-Microchip
- 1yr Rabies Vaccination
- Spay/neuter surgery
- Initial FVRCP vaccination
(needs booster in 3-4 weeks)
-Microchip
-Dewormer
-Flea Prevention
-FELV/FIV Test

The Beaver County Humane Society also offers Have-A-Heart Trap Rental Program. A $30.00 deposit is required for each trap rented for a duration of 2 weeks. Once the trap is returned to our facility, the full $30.00 deposit is then refunded to the client. Deposits are forfeit if the trap is lost, broken, or not returned. 


Why is spaying/neutering important?

In the United States each year, thousands of pets find themselves homeless or in a shelter waiting for their adoption day, but ultimately there are not enough homes to go around. By spaying/neutering your pet, you are helping to prevent pet overpopulation, pet homelessness, and pet overcrowding at your local animal shelter.

Not to mention the several medical, behavioral, and financial advantages to altering your pets. Some benefits include: the potential for a increasing your pets life span, decreasing your pets chance of a reproductive cancers, the potential of removing unwanted behaviors, and completely removing the cost of caring for an unwanted litter. To see more information and benefits on spay(female)/neuter(male), click on the link(s) below!

ASPCA-Importance of Spay/Neuter
The Humane Society of the United States-Spay/Neuter Myths

Is this cat feral or a stray?

A stray cat is domesticated and social and/or non-fearful of human beings. Stray cats have either become lost or abandoned, and are in search of their owners. A feral cat has had little to no interaction with humans, they are typically fearful or aggressive when approached. Feral cats are considered to be wild animals and are incredibly self-sufficient in their natural habitat. They maintain a territory that they may or may not share with other feral cats, this is called a Colony!

To help you determine whether you have a feral or a stray cat, ask yourself the following questions. If you answer no to most or all of these questions, you are more than likely dealing with a feral cat. If you answer yes to most or all of these questions, you may be dealing with a lost or abandoned pet.

  1. Have I ever seen this cat before?
  2. Can I pet and pick-up/hold this cat?
  3. Is this cat displaying fearful/flighty or aggressive behavior?

What is Trap, Neuter, Return and why is it beneficial?

Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR), is the practice of humanely trapping a feral cat and having them spayed/neutered, eartipped, and vaccinated against rabies. The animal is then released back in the area where they were trapped. Since feral cats are often unable to be safely made available for adoption, TNR programs provide a humane alternative to euthanasia by allowing the cat to return to its natural habitat without the possibility of adding to the cat overpopulation issue.

Any feral cat that is altered should be returned to the original area they were trapped because, like a wild animal, that is their territory and they know where to find the basic resources for survival. If a feral cannot be returned to their original trapping area for whatever reason, they should be released in an area that is maintained by a colony caretaker. A colony caretaker is a person that dedicates their time (and often money!) to feeding/watering, providing adequate shelter, and ensuring all cats are altered, eartipped, and vaccinated against rabies.

What is “eartipping” and why is it done?


An eartip is the universal sign of an altered, feral cat. A typical eartip is conducted on the left ear. The procedure involves removing about ¼ inch off the tip of the ear while the cat is under anesthesia for their spay/neuter surgery. Eartips heal rapidly and typically do not cause a cat pain or other medical issues down the road. Marking a cat with an eartip helps to prevent the cat from receiving unnecessary surgery (if re-trapped), being confined by humans, or being euthanized. So if you ever see a cat outside, with a little bit of the top of their ear missing, you might be seeing an altered, feral cat!

What is a microchip and how can it help lost pets?


A microchip is about the size of a grain of rice and is implanted between the animals’ shoulder blades in the subcutaneous tissue. The microchip has a number (ranging between 9-15 digits) that is linked to it’s barcode inside the chip. The number can be registered by the owner with all their contact information on the appropriate microchip brand website.


Disclaimer*

We are not a full service veterinary clinic. Cats receiving spay/neuter surgery at our facility will NOT receive presurgical bloodwork or an examination by the veterinarian. We recommend visiting your personal veterinarian prior to scheduling surgery, but it is not required to schedule an appointment.

Click here to apply for a spay/neuter surgery appointment